Cycling laws

Cycling laws


Transport Minister Jesse Norman has announced that the Government is to review whether a new law is required to cover dangerous cycling.

This follows the tragic death of Kim Briggs, who was killed after colliding with cyclist Charlie Alliston, who was riding an illegal fixed-gear bike which had no front brakes. This type of bike is built for the track and is not allowed on the road.

Alliston was convicted under an old Victorian offence of ‘wanton or furious driving’. There have been calls for a change in the law so that cyclists are included under dangerous driving offences, which is not currently the case as a cycle is classed as a carriage being not mechanically propelled.

RoSPA supports and encourages safe cycling and has consistently campaigned for measures to make cycling as safe as possible. No road users, including cyclists, should put themselves and others at risk as a result of their own actions.

It is understood that this review will consider more widely how cyclists share the road with other road users, including pedestrians. Let’s hope that the focus is on safety rather than just giving the courts more legal options in the event of dangerous cycling.

Yes, it’s important that victims have appropriate legal and financial protection, and that those who insist on endangering others are dealt with consistently and in a proportionate fashion by the courts irrespective of who they are and what means of transport they are using, but safety should be the central focus of this inquiry.

Nick Lloyd, road safety manager

Posted: 21/09/2017 15:36:35 1 comments


20/10/2017 18:25:08

Caroline Pybus

As a pedestrian I feel the most a risk when cyclists and pedestrians are on a shared path. 3 times lately I have had near-collisions with bikes coming up silently from behind. I don't weave around and if I alter course I look behind first!

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