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Stay safe this winter and be carbon monoxide aware

   Stay safe this winter and be carbon monoxide aware

RoSPA is supporting the Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week campaign to raise awareness of the new rules for carbon monoxide alarms in homes, and to help people stay safe from carbon monoxide poisoning this winter.

Tens of people die from carbon monoxide poisoning every year, and thousands are harmed. But with a little lifesaving knowledge, exposure to carbon monoxide can be easily avoided.

From 21 – 27 November, Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week will highlight the new rules for carbon monoxide alarms in homes, show where to seek additional support, and explain how to recognise carbon monoxide poisoning.

As a supporter of the All-Party Parliamentary Carbon Monoxide Group, RoSPA was delighted to see the law change to require alarms in millions more homes and improve carbon monoxide safety in society:
  • Since 1 October, landlords in England have been required to provide carbon monoxide alarms for all rooms in the home where there is a ‘fixed combustion appliance’; such as a fireplace or a boiler. The rules do not apply for gas cookers. Landlords must take into account the needs of any disabled tenants. Failure to comply can result in a £5,000 fine.
  • From 1 December, landlords in Wales will have to provide carbon monoxide alarms for all rooms in the home where there is a fuel burning appliance. Homes that need a smoke or a carbon monoxide alarm and do not have one are considered unfit for human habitation.
  • Since 1 February, homes in Scotland have been required to have carbon monoxide alarms in rooms with fuel burning appliances, except those used solely for cooking, under the new Tolerable Standard. Carbon monoxide alarms must carry the British Kitemark EN 50291-1 to ensure they are of a safe and reliable quality.
  • In Northern Ireland, the Private Tenancies Act from earlier this year requires carbon monoxide alarms to be installed in privately rented homes, plus places a duty on landlords to repair them. It received Royal Assent in April 2022
Carbon monoxide is sometimes called “the silent killer” – you can’t smell it, see it or taste it, and yet a leak – from a faulty boiler, fire, gas cooker or wood burner, for example – can be deadly.

The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) recently intervened to ensure that more than 66,000 cookers which pose a carbon monoxide poisoning risk will be made safe through a modification programme.
OPSS analysed product safety data which revealed certain models of Glen Dimplex gas cookers with a separate gas grill have an inherent carbon monoxide risk putting consumers in danger. The models affected are Belling, New World and Stoves.

Until their cookers are made safe, OPSS is advising those using the affected models to ensure they always leave the grill door open when in operation. (Further information can be found here).

Ashley Martin, RoSPA’s Public Health Adviser, said: “As a charity that has been active in highlighting the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning for many years, we strongly welcome the Office for Product Safety and Standards' decision to ensure Glen Dimplex Home Appliances send inspectors to each home that might be housing faulty Belling, New World and Stoves gas cookers. Hopefully as a result many accidents will be prevented. 
 
It is a priority of RoSPA’s to ensure people are educated on the risks of carbon monoxide poisoning and encourage anyone worried about its affects to read our advice page.
 
We also recommend that all gas oven users should have their and their family's appliances examined to ensure they are safe to run. Further still, many white goods remain unregistered, with the possible inclusion of Glen Dimplex Home Appliances, and may have been missed from the recall.” 
Posted: 11/22/2022 10:40:28 AM 0 comments



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